Arlington Career Center | 816 S. Walter Reed St. | Arlington, VA | 22204

ACC Chronicle

ACC Chronicle

Arlington Career Center | 816 S. Walter Reed St. | Arlington, VA | 22204

ACC Chronicle

24 with ‘24: Sophia Lander
24 with '24
24 with ‘24: Sophia Lander
Lydia Blackwell, Staff Reporter • April 23, 2024

24 with ’24 is a Chronicle series where we ask 24 questions to a member of the class of ’24. Between now and June, we’ll shine a spotlight...

Song of Daphne
Creative Writing
Song of Daphne
Heibein, Guest Reporter • April 22, 2024

What will you do, when he’s coming for you? Oh, Daphne. What will you do? He’s bright as the sun, nowhere to run. Oh, Daphne. What...

Career Profile: Jennifer Clark, Anthropologist at the Smithsonian
Career Exploration
Career Profile: Jennifer Clark, Anthropologist at the Smithsonian
Zack Dabrowski, Staff Reporter • April 22, 2024

It was a bright sunny day in East Africa and Jennifer Clark was about to make one of her coolest discoveries yet: the skeleton of a fossil elephant...

Koibots Get Loud at District Championships
Clubs & Extras
Koibots Get Loud at District Championships
Clara Golner, Staff Reporter • April 22, 2024

On Thursday, April 4, at 6 am, thirty-one ACC students and two adults boarded a bus to Petersburg, Virginia, for Chesapeake District Playoffs....

Career Profile: Cathy Pinskey, Director of Mason Facilities
Career Exploration
Career Profile: Cathy Pinskey, Director of Mason Facilities
Maggie Odar, Lead Designer, Reporter, Editor, Social Media Manager • April 22, 2024

Pursuing a career in architecture can often feel like putting all your eggs in one basket. However, Cathy Pinskey shows that architecture is...

CTE Spotlight: Carpentry

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  • Carrie shows off a variety of Carpentry products on CTE night.

  • Diego adjusts the router.

  • Mr. Godfrey measures parts for his trestle table.

  • Issac cuts circles on the bandsaw.

  • Carrie shows off her dovetailed toolbox

What sounds do you imagine when you think of carpentry? The rasp of saws? The pounding of hammers? If this was the 1950s, you’d be right. But Carpentry II at ACC is not your grandfather’s woodshop class. In our high-tech classroom, you’ll hear the whirring of electric saws and the industrial rumble of the dust collection system. But despite all its state-of-the-art tools and machinery, as a new class that’s only been available starting this year, Carpentry II has an enrollment problem. This year’s class has only six students. The good news is that we can interview all of them!

Enter Carrie Tiroff, an enthusiastic Arlington Tech senior with a passion for high level joinery. She’s making a toolbox using the finger joint method, a complicated process involving many interlocking parts. She says that “Carpentry means being able to make something out of nothing, to experiment and to learn new, better ways of building.” She’s been accepted in the Residential Construction Management program at Penn Tech, but is still thinking about trade school.

There are also two Arlington Tech juniors: Akshay Kuchibhatla, a programmer who loves to saw, and Issac, a hater of dad jokes. Akshay says “Carpentry is an art that so few appreciate,” and Issac compares it to therapy, because of how calming it is. They are the only Arlington Tech students who will be able to take Carpentry III if it is offered next year.

There are also a couple of Yorktown students who make the bus ride over to the Career Center every day just for this class. Charlie Whitmore, a thorough senior who prefers independent projects over assignments from the project book, jokes that “Carpentry rocks, I mean, it woods.” Diego Gonzales, a junior with a killer handshake who hopes to build “the next Noah’s Ark,” says he likes Carpentry II because he likes doing big projects.

This class, which has brought together a group of students from different schools and different grades who would otherwise never have known each other, would not be possible without its instructor. Mr. Godfrey, an ex-middle school teacher from Pennsylvania who is a father of two and passionate about his craft, says that Carpentry is a class that can be useful to anyone, regardless of their career plans. “You don’t have to leave this class and become a carpenter,” he says, “but most people live in a house when they grow up, and in a house things break, and if you have just a little bit of proficiency with power tools, you can fix almost anything.” That’s what Carpentry, with all its state-of-the-art machines is for: so that a passionate few can become professional carpenters, and the rest can leave with enough knowledge and confidence to reattach a door when the hinges break instead of having to hire someone else.

About the Contributor
Lydia Blackwell
Lydia Blackwell, Staff Reporter
Lydia is a sports reporter for the Chronicle and a senior at Arlington Tech. In her spare time, she enjoys reading and writing short stories. You can usually finding her walking in the woods or talking about thought experiments.