Arlington Career Center | 816 S. Walter Reed St. | Arlington, VA | 22204

ACC Chronicle

ACC Chronicle

Arlington Career Center | 816 S. Walter Reed St. | Arlington, VA | 22204

ACC Chronicle

Groundbreaking
School News
Groundbreaking
Bella Weslow, Staff Reporter • June 12, 2024

On May 16th, 2024, a monumental event occurred for the students and staff of the Arlington Career Center. At 2 pm, students and teachers left...

Latinas Leading Tomorrow at ACC
Clubs & Extras
Latinas Leading Tomorrow at ACC
Lary Renderos, Guest Reporter • June 12, 2024

Let’s zoom into the bustling hive of activity that is ACC (let's throw some props to our extracurricular buffet: from frisbee to D&D, there's...

Op Ed: A Call for Accelerated Learning in APS
Op Ed
Op Ed: A Call for Accelerated Learning in APS
Joseph Sparks, Guest Reporter • June 12, 2024

Dear Arlington Public Schools, As I prepare to begin my education at Princeton University next fall, I often look back and consider the impact...

Op Ed: Let’s Expand Restorative Justice in Virginia
Op Ed
Op Ed: Let’s Expand Restorative Justice in Virginia
Zack Dabrowski, Staff Reporter • June 12, 2024

Dear Barbara A. Favola, In one month, I will have graduated from high school and be ready for the next stage of my life. When I look back...

Acme Pie Company
Community & Beyond
Acme Pie Company
Zack Dabrowski, Staff Reporter • June 12, 2024

Acme Pie Co., located barely a block from the school, is one of the only pie shops within Arlington - and it’s also the best. Walking towards...

Exploring the Solar Eclipse

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  • Moon moving to sun

  • Dr.Miller stands in front of the building with 2 students

  • ACC students out in front of the building watching the eclipse

  • Moon moving in front of sunspots

  • Moon moving in front of sunspots

  • Sun in partial solar eclipse

  • View of the suns Corona

  • View of the suns Corona

  • Photo by Samantha Parker in path of totality

  • Photo by Samantha Parker in path of totality

  • Total eclipse from path of totality, Photo by Samantha Parker

  • Sun partially blocked by moon

  • Sun partially blocked by moon

  • Solar eclipse viewed with glasses By Bella Weslow

You may have seen the Canvas announcement, gone to the Commons, or heard the news about the 2024 solar eclipse. It won’t be visible in totality everywhere, though, so you should visit the NASA website to see when and where it will be visible.

A solar eclipse is when Earth’s Moon passes in front of the sun and blocks it from view. A partial eclipse, when the moon covers only part of the sun, is more common. On the other hand, a total solar eclipse happens less often and is when the sun is completely blocked from view. 

At 2:30 on Monday, students rushed outside to the front of the school to see the eclipse (and their friends). Earlier in the day, teachers had handed out special eclipse glasses to students to prepare them for the viewing later in the day. Dr. Miller and Ms. Brody had a telescope with a special lens set up to allow students and teachers to get a closer view of the sun. They were also available to answer any questions about Monday’s happenings. Many students stayed after

school to be able to view the eclipse at the highest point of totality we got, 76-79%.

Places like Cleveland, Buffalo, Indianapolis, and a few others are in the umbra, or the shadow cast by the moon when the sun is completely blocked from view. Other places like Arlington are in the penumbra, or the shadow cast by the moon that isn’t completely dark.

It’s important to wear special glasses when viewing the eclipse because the bright light can blind you. If you are in a location where the solar eclipse will be visible in totality then when the sun is fully blocked from view, the only way to view the eclipse is to take your glasses off. Just be sure that the sun is completely blocked from view when you take off your glasses or you run the risk of being blinded.

We are grateful that Dr. Miller and Ms. Brody made the preparations for us to be able to view an incredible astronomical event together as a school, especially since the next solar eclipse we can view from Arlington won’t happen until after we all graduate. However some people may head to other countries to see the partial and total eclipses happening there.

About the Contributor
Bella Weslow
Bella Weslow, Staff Reporter
Bella is a junior at Arlington Tech and a JROTC cadet. She can often be seen reading or carrying around a stack of books. In her free time, Bella enjoys spending time with her dog, playing video games, and running around the soccer field. She hopes to join the military after college and work in a science related field.