Arlington Career Center | 816 S. Walter Reed St. | Arlington, VA | 22204

ACC Chronicle

ACC Chronicle

Arlington Career Center | 816 S. Walter Reed St. | Arlington, VA | 22204

ACC Chronicle

24 with ‘24: Sophia Lander
24 with '24
24 with ‘24: Sophia Lander
Lydia Blackwell, Staff Reporter • April 23, 2024

24 with ’24 is a Chronicle series where we ask 24 questions to a member of the class of ’24. Between now and June, we’ll shine a spotlight...

Song of Daphne
Creative Writing
Song of Daphne
Heibein, Guest Reporter • April 22, 2024

What will you do, when he’s coming for you? Oh, Daphne. What will you do? He’s bright as the sun, nowhere to run. Oh, Daphne. What...

Career Profile: Jennifer Clark, Anthropologist at the Smithsonian
Career Exploration
Career Profile: Jennifer Clark, Anthropologist at the Smithsonian
Zack Dabrowski, Staff Reporter • April 22, 2024

It was a bright sunny day in East Africa and Jennifer Clark was about to make one of her coolest discoveries yet: the skeleton of a fossil elephant...

Koibots Get Loud at District Championships
Clubs & Extras
Koibots Get Loud at District Championships
Clara Golner, Staff Reporter • April 22, 2024

On Thursday, April 4, at 6 am, thirty-one ACC students and two adults boarded a bus to Petersburg, Virginia, for Chesapeake District Playoffs....

Career Profile: Cathy Pinskey, Director of Mason Facilities
Career Exploration
Career Profile: Cathy Pinskey, Director of Mason Facilities
Maggie Odar, Lead Designer, Reporter, Editor, Social Media Manager • April 22, 2024

Pursuing a career in architecture can often feel like putting all your eggs in one basket. However, Cathy Pinskey shows that architecture is...

Teacher Feature: Dr. Rankin

Teacher Dr. Rankin and student AJ Scally.

You may have heard of or even be familiar with the name Dr. Rankin. He is our school’s Algebra II and Algebra III teacher. When I was a freshman, I had no idea who this guy was. But I heard about him all the time, whether it was from upperclassmen, or kids in my grade. Everyone had something to say about him. Now, this year, I’m taking Algebra II Intensified, and I completely understand why.

Before taking his class, I knew him because of his famous, or rather, infamous rants. He has the tendency to launch into spiels about things, whether it be about alligators, nuclear power, the education system, or taxes. They are known far and wide, and many people think they are the best part of taking his class. He launches into them out of the blue, unless someone has heard about his opinion on something and goaded him into talking about it. Now that I am in his class, they are the highlight of my entire day. There is something about his personality that makes the intensity of the rants hilarious. I think it probably has to do with how out of pocket they are, and the fact that you never expect them. It’s something that you have to experience yourself to fully understand the greatness of.

The second thing I heard about him was his peculiar teaching style. Instead of just teaching lessons in class, he also gives the option of taking the class essentially completely online. At the start of the year, I was excited about that, thinking I would have a free period. I was humbled after about a week, remembering how lazy I was and how much I hate math homework. Lucky for me, homework is only weighted 5% in his class. But, in order not to fail, I have to do it all anyway.

His different teaching style also introduced Quick Checks, which are quizzes you take every class period to test you on the concepts you learned last class. They are supposed to be extremely easy, and he even offers study guides for every single one. If you do the study guide, you can retake the Quick Check and get more time to take the quiz. You’d think, with this extremely generous policy, everyone would be acing these. You’d be wrong. Last year, everyone in my grade was constantly complaining about the most recent Quick Check that they’d bombed. It turns out those people were not doing the homework. Why do it if it was weighted so little? Because you’ll fail every single quiz, that’s why. Take it from a kid I know who’s failing because I see his papers given back covered in more red pen than pencil.

When asked if he thought it was Dr. Rankin’s fault that he was failing, he said “Not at all…I do homework, just not enough. He’s a great guy for staying after school literally everyday for kids who are failing because of themselves. He’s entertaining and I appreciate the fact that he prepares us for other math classes. Also, I’m not failing, just struggling. Greatly.”

My classmate, who asked to remain anonymous, has the right idea. If you’re failing Dr. Rankin’s class, it’s through a fault of your own. He hands out daily opportunities to improve your grade. You can retake any quiz at either Archer’s Period or after school every day. Earlier this quarter, I fell behind because of Thanksgiving break and bombed a few Quick Checks. Because of his amazing retake policy, I managed to pull my grade back up to an A. Every single time I walked into his room to retake a quiz, there was a line of about five people at his desk. He took the time and care to thoroughly answer and help every student in the line, even if they were just there to turn in a missing assignment. The fact that he is willing to spend a large portion of his day helping the people who are struggling in his class says a lot about his character, and what an amazing teacher he is.

About the Contributor
AJ Scally
AJ Scally, Staff Reporter
AJ is a sophomore at Arlington Tech and a writer for the ACC Chronicle. He is an active member of the school's Robotics and Frisbee teams. He is interested in both aviation and engineering and plans to become a pilot after college. You can find AJ in Mr. Frazier’s classroom during 1st and 2nd lunches.