Arlington Career Center | 816 S. Walter Reed St. | Arlington, VA | 22204

ACC Chronicle

ACC Chronicle

Arlington Career Center | 816 S. Walter Reed St. | Arlington, VA | 22204

ACC Chronicle

PBL Freshman Cornerstone Town Hall
Uncategorized
PBL Freshman Cornerstone Town Hall
Amna Abdelbagi, Staff Reporter • May 24, 2024

It's finally that time of the year, the Cornerstone Town Hall that everyone has been waiting for! After all the ninth graders' hard work, students...

Bites on the Pike: Lost Dog Café
Community & Beyond
Bites on the Pike: Lost Dog Café
Clara Golner and Ilana HofferMay 24, 2024

Within the first moments of walking inside, the smell of tasty Italian food fills your nose. You look around at the art on the walls, listen...

Bites on the Pike: Ididos Coffee
Community & Beyond
Bites on the Pike: Idido's Coffee
Amna Abdelbagi, Staff Reporter • May 20, 2024

Only five minutes away from ACC, Idido’s Coffee should definitely be on your next “to-go” list! Idido’s Coffee is a cafe designed for...

Bites on the Pike: Ryu Izakaya
Community & Beyond
Bites on the Pike: Ryu Izakaya
Clara Golner and Ilana HofferMay 20, 2024

Ryu Izakaya is a small restaurant camouflaged among the many on Columbia Pike, but it is truly a hidden gem. When you walk inside, you are immediately...

Street Advocate Club
Clubs & Extras
Street Advocate Club
Cody Finnegan, Clara Golner, and Bella WeslowMay 20, 2024

One of ACC’s newer clubs is the Street Advocates Student Coalition (SASC), started by junior Cody Finnegan. The SASC’s mission is “to bring...

APS’ First Cultural Night

Cultural Night leaders (Lamia Tarannum, Marlene Reyes, and Isalem Daza Velez) with Ms. Monica, Ms. Caparotta, and Kobie Griffin. Photo by APS DEI Staff. 

The Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Office and Arlington Career Center student leaders (Marlene Reyes, Lamia Tarannum, and Isalem Daza Velez) hosted APS County-Wide Cultural Night. The student coordinator’s main goal for the night was to gather community members from different cultural backgrounds and allow them to showcase their cultures in various ways. The APS Cultural Night, hosted at Wakefield High School, allowed members of the Arlington community to display their country, culture, and ethnic traditions through storytelling, food, dance, cultural dress, arts, and many other activities.

First, the Arlington Career Center JROTC volunteers started the night with a color guard. They also welcomed guests who entered the building. The cadets provided a warm and friendly environment to start the beginning of the Cultural Night experience.

Next, one of the most significant parts of the night was the diverse range of performances. Community members performed dances and songs related to their culture in the Wakefield cafeteria. The Tinkus Dance Group represented Bolivia, the Honduras group performed a Punta dance, a group of students did a traditional Uzbekistan dance, Ethiopia and Eritrea combined to showcase their countries, and Sudan performed multiple dances. Keylin from El Salvador sang Mi Pías, and lastly, Palestinian students performed belly dancing. The performances allowed people to showcase the beauty of all their cultures and backgrounds.

Also, individuals from all over the world showcased tri-fold boards at their tables to display various features of their countries. Guests walked around the town hall, exploring the different regions and learning more about the ethnic traditions. Countries including Sudan, Palestine, Brazil, South Korea, Italy, Morocco, Uzbekistan, Georgia, Bolivia, Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador, Peru, China, Philippines, Colombia, Eritrea, Bangladesh, India, Ethiopia, Eritrea, and Argentina were represented.

Additionally, the potluck was a huge hit. Parents, families, and guests brought trays of food from their countries to share with everyone. The hallway was lined with meals from all over the world. Guests filled their plates with dishes from various countries and enjoyed their meals while watching performances in the cafeteria. The potluck served food items like dumplings, kimbap, Dominican chicken, and more. The cuisine is often a reflection of a country’s geography and climate, so trying foods from different parts of the world can provide insights to individuals about a country they might not be familiar with. The potluck was a great way for guests to learn about food in all corners of the world. Another important contribution was our Wakefield custodial team who from the beginning, before, during, and after supported the event!

In conclusion, Cultural Night was an elegant and diverse tapestry of the many cultures in Arlington County. Over one hundred community members volunteered to perform, set up, and serve meals, making this event phenomenal. The night brought over four hundred guests from all age groups and schools in APS together to celebrate their diverse backgrounds. The coordinators would like to thank everyone who made this event possible, and they wish to see all guests again for next school year’s Cultural Night.