Arlington Career Center | 816 S. Walter Reed St. | Arlington, VA | 22204

ACC Chronicle

ACC Chronicle

Arlington Career Center | 816 S. Walter Reed St. | Arlington, VA | 22204

ACC Chronicle

24 with ‘24: Sophia Lander
24 with '24
24 with ‘24: Sophia Lander
Lydia Blackwell, Staff Reporter • April 23, 2024

24 with ’24 is a Chronicle series where we ask 24 questions to a member of the class of ’24. Between now and June, we’ll shine a spotlight...

Song of Daphne
Creative Writing
Song of Daphne
Heibein, Guest Reporter • April 22, 2024

What will you do, when he’s coming for you? Oh, Daphne. What will you do? He’s bright as the sun, nowhere to run. Oh, Daphne. What...

Career Profile: Jennifer Clark, Anthropologist at the Smithsonian
Career Exploration
Career Profile: Jennifer Clark, Anthropologist at the Smithsonian
Zack Dabrowski, Staff Reporter • April 22, 2024

It was a bright sunny day in East Africa and Jennifer Clark was about to make one of her coolest discoveries yet: the skeleton of a fossil elephant...

Koibots Get Loud at District Championships
Clubs & Extras
Koibots Get Loud at District Championships
Clara Golner, Staff Reporter • April 22, 2024

On Thursday, April 4, at 6 am, thirty-one ACC students and two adults boarded a bus to Petersburg, Virginia, for Chesapeake District Playoffs....

Career Profile: Cathy Pinskey, Director of Mason Facilities
Career Exploration
Career Profile: Cathy Pinskey, Director of Mason Facilities
Maggie Odar, Lead Designer, Reporter, Editor, Social Media Manager • April 22, 2024

Pursuing a career in architecture can often feel like putting all your eggs in one basket. However, Cathy Pinskey shows that architecture is...

CTE Spotlight: Computer Science

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  • Mr. Elkner the comp science teacher in his room

  • Altair 8000 replica

  • Computer lab corrner

Within the entire field of STEM, technology may be the fastest growing field today, as almost every job around relates in some way to computers. It’s only fitting, then, that Computer Science is one of the most popular electives here at the Career Center.

The Computer Science pathway has a goal of being job-ready. It starts in freshman year with the class DE Webpage Design and Multimedia (non-DE options are available), or sophomore year with the DE Computer Programming course. Webpage Design and Multimedia focuses on the “front end” of computer science, which is similar to the actors in a play. The class teaches programming languages like HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. DE Computer Programming focuses on the “back end” of programming, playing a similar role to a tech crew during a play. This DE class offers six credits for NOVA, which is two classes (one per semester). You use a web application framework written in Python called Django. Students who take Webpage Design and Multimedia have an advantage in this class since they can program the front end as well as the back end.

Rising freshmen and sophomores should keep in mind that there are specific requirements to take DE classes in their grade levels: they must have at least a 2.25 GPA at the end of their current grade level, have completed and passed at least 1 high school course in middle school, and they must apply to NOVA, register for the course on NOVA’s DE website, and upload their transcript. Rising sophomores will be guided through this process with other sophomores taking DE classes, and rising freshmen should reach out to their current counselors if they have questions.

One positive about taking the computer science pathway is that it is a very popular pathway for NOVA’s Associate’s Degree. This is the equivalent of two years of college, taken all in high school for both college and high school credit. Most students taking Computer Science are intending to pursue either an Associate’s Degree or General Education Certificate (the equivalent of one year of college) at NOVA. 

Alongside the positive of completing half of college when you’re still in high school, the computer science field is growing by the day. Almost all jobs out there will require some familiarity with computers, and more jobs require some form of computer programming experience— especially in the STEM field. Artificial intelligence is also growing fast, and while some say it may replace computer science jobs entirely, it could also take the field farther than ever imagined. No matter what advancements are made, the Computer Science field is the future of our world.

About the Contributor
Clara Golner
Clara Golner, Staff Reporter
Clara is currently a junior at Arlington Tech and enjoys writing all sorts of things— short stories, longer stories, or articles for the newspaper— as well as reading, playing video games, exercising, or drawing (not very well, but nobody has to know that).